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Home  |  Gods   |  South American Gods   |  Inca Gods   |  Pachamama : The Earth Goddess

Pachamama : The Earth Goddess

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At a glance

Description
Origin Inca Mythology
Classification Gods
Family Members Axomamma (Mother), Inti (Son)
Region Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Columbia
Associated With Agriculture, Earthquakes, Fertility

Pachamama

Introduction

The goddess of the Incans, known as Pachamama, was regarded as an agricultural deity whose role was to protect the crops and fertility. It is still customary in the Andes, when drinking chica, to pour a small portion on the ground as an offering to Pachamama. In the Andes, people believe that they should live in harmony with nature and refrain from taking too much from it. When they are disrespected, it is believed that earthquakes will occur.

To ensure that they were looked upon favourably, the people of the Andes regularly made offerings to the goddess. These ceremonies are known as pago a la tierra, and they involve offerings of various traditional items such as corn beer and cocoa leaves. Shrines honouring the goddess are made from the trunks of trees or rocks.

Physical Traits

Pachamama is depicted as an adult female with a peaceful demeanour bearing harvest of potato and cocoa leaves.

Family

The Incas in Peru and parts of Bolivia, Chile, Colombia and Ecuador believe that she is the mother of Inti, the Sun God, although some sources say this was her husband. The potato goddess Axomama is also considered to be a daughter of Pachamama.

Other Names

In the indigenous Quechua language, Pachamama (also known as Mama Pacha) translates as Mother Earth or Mother Cosmos. In other cultures, she is referred to as Gaia, La Pachamama and Mother Earth.

Powers and Abilities

In history, when people would take too much from the land or did not treat her with respect, the Inca described Pachamama as a dragon beneath the mountains that would shake, causing earthquakes, as a reminder to honor her.

Modern Day Influence

Pachamama is growing in relevance in the modern narrative of countries like Bolivia and Peru where the worship and traditional religion practices are facing a revival. Invoking blessings of Pachamama is now an accepted practice even among the Christians of the region.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.