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Home  |  Gods   |  South American Gods   |  Inca Gods   |  Axomamma : The Potato Goddess

Axomamma : The Potato Goddess

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At a glance

Description
Origin Inca Mythology
Classification Gods
Family Members Pachamama (Mother)
Region Bolivia, Ecuador, Columbia, Chile, Peru
Associated With Potatoes

Axomamma

Introduction

Axomamma is considered to be the Goddess of potatoes in Incan mythology. She is a neutral god whose whole responsibility is considered to be to help the Incan people with the cultivation of potatoes that had slowly begun to replace maize as the primary source of nutrition.

She came into prominence after the Inca learned how to cultivate potatoes on their own without having to rely on the wild potatoes that grew on the Andean mountains. It is also believed that the dead were buried with a potato to symbolise the blessings of Axomamma in the afterlife as well.

Physical Traits

Not much is known about Axomamma but every family was known to have an oddly shaped potato at home which they worshipped. She is sometimes depicted as wearing the traditional Incan dress and holding a stalk of potatoes in each hand.

Family

She is one of the daughters of Pachamama or Mama Pacha, the earth mother. Although she is credited as being the deity behind the potato, Pachamama accepts the sacrifices or offerings on her behalf.

Other Names

Axomamma is known by different names based on the region where she is being worshipped. He has been known to have the following names Acsumama, Ajomama, Axomama, Potato Lady, Potato Mother.

Powers and Abilities

Apart from influencing the cultivation of potatoes by providing for a good harvest, Axomamma is not shown to impact the cosmology of the Inca. As per Incan mythology, she remains neutral or indifferent to the requirements of the Inca.

Modern Day Influence

Although most experts agree that Axomamma is an important part of the Inca mythology, they have failed to understand why there are not more representations, festivals or religious traditions associated with the deity.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Who is the god of potatoes?

Axomamma, a deity linked to potatoes, was revered by the Inca civilization, situated in present-day Peru. She is recognized as one of the daughters of Pachamama, the mother of the earth.

How was Axomamma Worshipped?

The Incan goddess Axomamma, associated with potatoes, received worship through diverse rituals. In addition to cultivating and consuming potatoes, the Incas held them in high esteem, incorporating them into burial practices for the deceased. Many villages venerated a distinctively shaped potato, employing it in rituals to seek a bountiful harvest.

What did the Incas call potato?

The Incas called the potato “chuño.” Chuño, a freeze-dried potato product, has been traditionally crafted by Quechua and Aymara communities in Bolivia and Peru.

Who is the Incan god of potatoes?

Axomamma is the Incan deity associated with potatoes. She is considered a protector of potato crops and is often invoked for a good harvest.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.