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Home  |  Gods   |  Egyptian Gods   |  Neper : The God of the Grain

Neper : The God of the Grain

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At a glance

Description
Origin Egyptian Mythology
Classification Gods
Family Members Nepit, Tayt (Wife), Renenutet (Mother)
Region Egypt
Associated With Grain, Agriculture

Neper

Introduction

The god of grains is Neper, who was the offspring of the harvest goddess Renenutet. He was regarded as a fertility Egyptian god and was linked to Osiris. In the religion of ancient Egypt, he was regarded as the lord of mouth and a source for nourishment. His female counterpart Nepit was the goddess of grain, and their consort may have been the weaving goddess Tayt.

An Egyptian god of food and nourishment, Neper, was worshipped throughout the country, especially in the Nile Delta. People regarded him as a kind of god of death and agriculture, and he was often referred to as a representation of the underworld and Osiris.

Physical Traits

Neper was often depicted in human form, wearing a short kilt and a crown or headdress that featured his name symbol. Sometimes he also carried a staff or a scepter that represented his power and authority. He was usually shown with a youthful appearance, indicating his vitality and vigor.

Family

The god Neper’s mother was named Renenutet, who was known for being the harvest and nourishment goddess. She was also regarded as a goddess of destiny and fate, and she granted ren, or the original name, to every person born. People often depicted her as a woman with a head resembling that of a cobra.

Nepit was the goddess of grains, and she was often regarded as Neper’s wife or sister. They were linked to the harvest goddess Renenutet due to their contrasting perspectives on nourishment and grain.

Tayt was Neper’s consort, and she may have been the goddess of textiles and weaving. She was also known to create magic and spells to ward off evil spirits. People would often depict her as a woman wearing a crown made of ostrich feathers.

Neper’s child may have been called Horus the Child or Harpocrates, and he was the child of Isis and Osiris, who represented renewal and rebirth following death. He was typically depicted with a side-lock of hair.

Other names

Neper was also known as Nepri or Nepra.

Powers and Abilities

Neper ruled over the seasons of the crops, ensuring that there was sufficient food for everyone. He was also responsible for protecting the crops from diseases and pests. He was highly regarded and worshipped in the Nile Delta, where he had temples and shrines. Mendes, which was a temple shared with the god Banebdjedet, was one of his main centers of worship.

Neper was also worshipped in various regions of Egypt, such as Memphis, where he had a chapel at Ptah‘s temple. In Thebes, he was worshipped at the altar of Amun, who was the king of the gods. His followers offered him various types of food, such as pastries, bread, and beer. People offered Neper various animals that feasted on grains, such as ducks, geese, and oxen. They performed rituals and carried out ceremonies to seek his blessings.

Modern Day Influence

Neper was regarded as a type of god of nourishment and grain, and he was depicted as a representation of Osiris. He was also said to be the one who lived after dying. During the harvest season, Neper would appear and disappear, just like Osiris did when he was resurrected. Slowly the cult of Neper disappeared and osiris took precedence over the original god.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.