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Home  |  Gods   |  Egyptian Gods   |  Isis : The Goddess of Healing

Isis : The Goddess of Healing

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At a glance

Description
Origin Egyptian Mythology
Classification Gods
Family Members Ra (Grandfather), Geb (Father), Nut (Mother), Seth (Brother), Nepthys (Sister, Osiris (Brother, Husband)
Region Egypt
Associated With Healing, Death

Isis

Introduction

One of the most prominent deities of ancient Egypt is Isis, also known as Egyptian Aset or Eset. She was an obscure goddess who eventually became a vital figure during the dynastic period. Isis was known for her ability to heal and transform people. She was also a loyal wife and mother, and she protected her loved ones from those who would hurt them.

Isis was a popular deity in the Roman Empire. Her cult spread throughout the empire, and she was worshipped in various countries, such as Afghanistan and England. As a mourner, she is regarded as a deity that helps bring the dead back to life. As a healer, she can cure the sick and bring them to life. She is also a role model for women. One of the most prominent goddesses in Egypt’s pantheon is Isis, the granddaughter of Ra and the mother of Horus.

Physical Traits

Isis was typically depicted in a human form, and she was known to carry a sistrum, an ancient instrument. At times, Isis would also bear the solar disk and cow horns usually associated with Hathor. She was typically depicted as a beautiful woman who was wearing a sheath dress. She was sometimes depicted as a bird, a cow, or a scorpion. She was also sometimes accompanied by a vulture headdress that was attributed to Mut. Isis adopted the attributes of these headdresses. She was also viewed as a winged goddess who traveled to the underworld to seek her husband.

Family

She was the fourth child of Geb and Nut. Her siblings, who were known as Osiris, Set, and Nephthys, were all older. She gave birth to a son named Horus the Younger, who was also her deceased brother. Their relationship was unusual, as the two started dating in the womb. After his mother abandoned him, Isis adopted the child of Nephthys and Osiris, who was called Anubis.

Other names

The origins of the names of Egyptian gods have been lost to translation and time, but some of the information that has been uncovered related to their etymology. For instance, Isis was depicted wearing a crown that resembled a hieroglyph for “throne.” Her name, which was also written in Ancient Egyptian, was assumed to mean “throne goddess.”

Powers and Abilities

The ancient Egyptians considered Isis to be a significant deity due to her numerous powers. She was a protector of women and a person who brought magic. She was initially regarded as a secondary deity to Osiris. However, after thousands of years, she became the Queen of the Universe.

During the Roman period, Isis was believed to have the power to control fate. Although she was known for being a ruthless and cruel goddess, she was also a loyal and compassionate person. She would do anything to get what she wanted, such as extorting Ra so that her child, Horus, would have the throne.

When Set and Horus were engaged in a competition, Isis betrayed her son. She also let go of a captured Set out of obligation. As a powerful sorceress, she was known for her ability to perform magical healing spells.

Modern Day Influence

The Islamic State group, which used to be called ISIL or ISIS, is unrelated to Egypt’s pantheon and Isis. The group’s English name originated from an acronym that originated from a literal translation. In the past few years, it has gone through multiple name changes and is now referred to as the Islamic State or Daesh.

In the Marvel Comics universe, Isis has been a recurring character. She first appeared in the 1975 issue of Thor. She was also referred to as a yellow lab in Downton Abbey, which highlighted her connection to the Egyptian goddess.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.