Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Home  |  Ghosts   |  Asian Ghosts   |  Thai Ghosts   |  Krahang : The Flying Man

Krahang : The Flying Man

Listen

At a glance

Description
Origin Thai Mythology
Classification Ghosts
Family Members Krasue (Partner)
Region Thailand
Associated With Black Magic, Bloodsucking

Krahang

Introduction

Krahang are believed to have been created by a man who once practiced sorcery, who then turned into a terrifying ghost when the magic backfired on him. Krahang is a normal man during the day who transforms into a ghost at night.

Physical Traits

The krahang uses a pair of large rice winnowing baskets, known as kradong, to fly in the rural areas of Thailand. It is also often shown as riding on the traditional wooden rice pounder sak tam khao. They are depicted as being shirtless and wearing only the traditional Thai loincloth.

Family

In some parts of Thailand the Krahang is considered to be the husband or partner of the Krasue, another female ghost in Thai mythology. They are often described as travelling together in their nocturnal journeys to harm or attack the people of the area they haunt.

Powers and Abilities

The Krahang has the ability to fly which it uses to terrorise the villagers. They are sometimes depicted as being bloodthirsty and attack animals although the primary diet consists of filth, garbage and human waste.

Modern Day Influence

The Krahang is a popular character in modern films, cartoons, anime and video games.

Related Images

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Your subscription could not be saved. Please try again.
Your subscription has been successful.

Newest addition

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the real story of Krasue?

The Krasue is a chilling figure of Southeast Asian folklore, typically depicted as a severed woman’s head with trailing entrails. This vengeful spirit, often said to be the result of a woman’s violent death or improper burial, floats through the night seeking blood to sustain itself.

What is the male version of Krasue?

The Krasue is a nocturnal female spirit rooted in Southeast Asian folklore. It is commonly associated with Krahang, a male spirit from Thai folklore, residing in similar regions. The Krahang is depicted as a spirit that hovers in the air above the ground, lacking a lower body. Consequently, the Krahang is sometimes regarded as the male counterpart to the Krasue in Thai folklore. It’s crucial to recognize, however, that despite their frequent mention together, the Krahang and Krasue are distinct entities with unique characteristics.

What is the Japanese folklore floating head?

In Japanese folklore, the floating head takes two forms: Rokurokubi, humans with necks that stretch to unnerving lengths, and Nukekubi, completely severed heads that fly at night. Both can be benevolent or malevolent, with stories depicting them as mischievous spies, vengeful bloodsuckers, or even tragic figures driven by a thirst for revenge. Despite their fearsome appearances, both types share a vulnerability during sleep when the head is detached, offering a glimmer of hope against their nocturnal terrors.

What is the myth of Krahang?

Krahang is a male spirit from Thai folklore known for its nocturnal activities. During the day, it lives as a normal villager, but at night, it transforms into a ghost. Krahang is often depicted as a shirtless man wearing a traditional loincloth, using two large kradong (round rice winnowing baskets) for flight. Some legends suggest that Krahang was once a man who practiced sorcery, but when the magic backfired, he turned into a ghost.

Watch

We know you love our quizzes?

Take our new quiz on Philippine Mythology and see if you can break the current record of 69%.

We challenge you to get a perfect 100%

We know you love our quizzes?

Take our new quiz on Philippine Mythology and see if you can break the current record of 69%.

We challenge you to get a perfect 100%

Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.