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Home  |  World Mythologies   |  Oceanian Mythology   |  Polynesian Mythology  |  Hawaiian Mythology

Hawaiian Mythology

Hawaiian mythology likely originated with Polynesian immigrants who came to the archipelago hundreds of years ago. The Hawaiian religion is polytheistic, meaning that there are many Hawaiian gods of varying importance. It also incorporates strong animistic beliefs: spirits reside on land, sea, volcanoes, and other non-human objects. In the Hawaiian world, man and nature were closely related, and all things reflected the presence of the gods. The origin of man was linked to the source of the islands, with landforms, plants, animals, and humans expressing themselves as individuals in a more prominent family of life and creation.

Ancient Hawaiians, like most indigenous peoples, felt a deep connection to nature and explained everything from the creation of the earth to the lava flowing from volcanoes through the stories of their gods and goddesses. Some of the prominent Gods of Hawaiian Mythology are Kane (the is the creator of the world), Ku (the god of war, prosperity, and sorcery. He was also said to be the god of the mountains and agriculture, and fishing), Pele (the goddess of volcanoes and fire) and Kanaloa (the god of the oceans and healing).

The ancient Hawaiians lived by the animistic philosophy that assigned living souls to animals, trees, stones, stars, clouds, and humans. Religion and mythology were intertwined in Hawaiian culture, and local legends and genealogies were preserved in songs, chants, and narratives.

The Aumakua are guardian gods of Hawaii and are incarnated as different animals. They can be represented by a number of animals such as crows and even dragons. (As were the Alolan Guardians.) These god deities were highly praised by their people with great feasts and family courtesy in Hawaiian mythology/religion.

Animals play a role as spirit guides in the Hawaiian tradition and are part of a culture that honours the visible and the invisible. Today, Hawaii maintains many ancient traditions, passing the meaning behind sacred symbols and importance to each generation. The symbols, often generated in nature, are still seen in nature, as well as through pieces of jewellery and tattoos.

Those who wear or worship the symbols are said to generate that energy behind the character. Keep the Aloha spirit and tradition alive through the energy, meaning, and spirit behind these ancient Hawaiian symbols.

Hawaiian Mythical Characters

Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.