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Home  |  World Mythologies   |  Asian Mythology  |  Malaysian Mythology

Malaysian Mythology

The Malaysian mythology is birthed out of diversified influences such as Buddhism, Hinduism, animism of the island, and Islam from the 14th century moving forward. Hence it is a religion with different beliefs system embedded in it.

There are various types of characters in Malaysian mythology.

One of them is the 10ft huge ape that dwells in a jungle. Malaysian fiction usually stares at the mouse-deer animal, and this animal is well known for surmounting obstacles. Also known as oily man, this monster has the ability to tweak between the human form and an oily man form in stories in Malaysian mythology. The next category is known as the toyol gets easily distracted with materials like marbles, coins, buttons, sweet and toys.

Known as a prolong, this character can perform magical tricks by putting the blood of the murderer in a jar and chanting incantation over the blood for 7-14 days. Another hybrid character is that if a weretiger who has to take in a potion made out of a corpse’s innards. In Malaysian mythology, ghosts can take different forms. They can be likened to Shikigami, which means their spirit belongs to a person and can be passed down from generation to generation. The ghosts in Malaysian mythology are known as the Hantu, and they are usually kept inside the jars.

The frezetta man descends after a heavy rainfall to attack and people in villages to eat. He is usually a very hairy man. There is also a huge demon with a very sharp tongue. Thus demon is self-destructive as it always attempts to lick up water in a stream and always ends up cutting itself. Then there is the devil who rapes women at night and the ghost of mothers who lost their lives in childhood. Yet, they are able to fly, and they turn into owls.

Malaysian Mythical Characters

Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.