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Home  |  Gods   |  South American Gods   |  Mayan Gods   |  Itzamna : The Wise One

Itzamna : The Wise One

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At a glance

Description
Origin Mayan Mythology
Classification Gods
Family Members Ix Chel (Wife), Hunab Ku (Son), Bacab (Son)
Region Mexico (Yucatan)
Associated With Science, Medicine, Calendar. Astronomy

Itzamna

Introduction

Itzamna is regarded as one of the most important gods in Mayan mythology, and the creator of the universe, and the supreme father of all things. In various myths, Itzamna is regarded as a culture hero who provided the Maya with the foundations of civilization. He reportedly taught them how to grow corn, how to use calendars, and how to practice medicine. He also established a system for dividing the land.

Itzamna is often depicted in various Mayan documents, and he also appears as a decorative deity on various Mayan structures. For instance, at the Palenque archaeological site, Itzamna can be seen on one of the temple platforms. Although not widely known outside of Mayan mythology, Itzamna is an important part of Mexican and Mayan culture.

Itzamna is regarded as the top god of the Mayan hierarchy, and he can be seen in various locations such as Palenque, Copan, and Stela 25. During the pre-Spanish period, he was depicted in various books and ceramic models. He was initially referred to as “god D,” but before the names of the Maya were deciphered, some archaeologists referred to him as “god X”.

Physical Traits

In various forms of art, such as wall paintings, sculptures, and codexes, Itzamna is depicted as an old man who is seated on a throne facing other deities, such as God L or N. He is also depicted as a wise priest who wears a tall cylindrical headdress that resembles a flower.

Itzamna is often depicted as a combination of a caiman and a human, and he is sometimes referred to as a two-headed underwater serpent. It’s believed that it’s a representation of what the Maya considered to be the universe’s reptilian structure. One of the most significant manifestations of Itzamna is the Bird of Heaven, which is also known as Itzam Yeh. This bird is usually associated with Vucub Caquix, who was a mythical monster killed by the heroes Xbalanque and Hunapuh.

Family

According to Maya mythology, Itzamná was part of the supreme power couple, husband to the elder version of the goddess Ix Chel (Goddess O), and together they were parents of all the other gods. He was also the son of Hunab Ku, who was the creator god of the Mayan universe. Itzamna was the father of Bacab, a fourfold deity of the interior of the earth. In an alternative tradition, Itzamna begot thirteen sons with Ix Chel, two of whom created the earth and humankind.

Other Names

In the language of the Mayans, Itzamna refers to a large fish, a caiman, or a creature that resembles a lizard. The “Itz” part of his name refers to various other things, such as “stuff of the clouds,” “divination,” or “foresee,” in the Nahuatl and Quechua versions of the word. Itzamna has various names, such as Kukulcan or Itzam Caban, but archaeologists refer to him as God D.

Powers and Abilities

In the stories of Itzamna, he is regarded as a creator who makes systems and processes that can only be described as scientific or logical. According to legend, Itzamna taught the Maya how to create calendars. During this period, the Maya used various types of calendars, such as a 260-day calendar and a 365-day calendar that was similar to the Gregorian calendar. They also created a calendar that spanned 52 years. The Maya used these documents to determine the ideal days for various activities, such as farming and religious worship. They also produced various other cultural documents.

Itzamna is credited with bringing scientific and technological innovations to the Maya people. He is considered a powerful force that combines the elements of the underworld, the earth, and the heavens. In the postclassic period, in the state of Yucatan, Itzamna was regarded as the god of medicine. During this time, people were often sick with ailments such as asthma and chills.

Modern Day Influence

Itzamna is usually the starting point for most researchers and Ancient Astronaut theorists who believe that the Mayan civilization were one of the pioneers in many scientific and cultural studies that has influenced the world. The Mayan calendar has constantly created intrigue and fear around the world because of the wrong notion that the world would end when their calendar runs out. This calendar is said to have been created by Itzamna who then manages to be central to the conversation. Marvel comics also featured a  character based on Itzamna and his powers.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is Itzamna god of?

Itzamna is considered to be the god who gave the Mayans the knowledge of science, technology and astronomy.

Why is Itzamna important to Mayans?

Itzamna is very important to the Mayans as it was he who gave the Mayans the concept of writing and astronomy which allowed them to record their civilization.

What does Itzamna look like?

Unlike other Mayan gods, Itzamna is represented as an old wise man who had a hooked nose and large eyes.

In which comic universe in did Itzamna appear?

Itzamna was a character in the Marvel comic universe.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.