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Home  |  Animals   |  Middle Eastern Animals   |  Arabian Animals   |  Falak : The Giant Snake

Falak : The Giant Snake

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At a glance

Description
Origin Arabian Mythology
Classification Animals
Family Members N/A
Region Middle East
Associated With Fire, Earthquake

Falak

Introduction

According to Arabian mythology, Falak is the giant serpent that lives below the fish known as Bahamut. It was also mentioned in the One Thousand and One Nights as a dangerous monster. It is said that it only fears God’s greater power and that prevents it from consuming all of creation.

Despite this, according to Islam, to describe Falak as omnipotent is wrong as either it is imaginary or the term is one which the religious should apply only to their god.

Physical Traits

Falaks are very dangerous but, thankfully, generally stay in the tunnels they dig out of the earth. Not terribly large, they are nonetheless capable of growing to a huge size if given enough food and water.

Other Names

Falak very closely resembles the Norse Jörmungandr which denote common proto-Aryan roots to the history of the creature.

Powers and Abilities

Falak is said to be immensely powerful, and could swallow the earth, the heavens and the six hells above it. They have an immunity to flames as well as being well able to withstand great amounts of heat.

Modern Day Influence

One Thousand and One Nights’ versions claim that a massive Falak lives beneath the Earth’s surface, but it avoids consuming everything that’s below it due to its fear of Allah. Although this myth is often ignored by American and European magizoologists, they can be considered evolutionary cousins to the Magma Pythons of today.

Falak also means the sky or the infinite power and is commonly used in Muslim names as Falaknaz, Falakjehan, Falak-an-nisa or simply Falak. Falak as a name connects with this serpent and persons having such names are held to possess such related qualities either constructive or destructive.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is the story of the falak?

According to Arabian mythology, Falak is the giant serpent that lives below the fish known as Bahamut. It was also mentioned in the One Thousand and One Nights as a dangerous monster.

Who is Falak in Arabian mythology?

One Thousand and One Nights’ versions claim that a massive Falak lives beneath the Earth’s surface, but it avoids consuming everything that’s below it due to its fear of Allah.

How strong is Falak?

Falak is said to be immensely powerful, and could swallow the earth, the heavens and the six hells above it. They have an immunity to flames as well as being well able to withstand great amounts of heat.

Is Falak real in Islam?

The falak is a character from the One Thousand and One Arabian Nights and a part of the folklore of the region. It is not explicitly mentioned in the Quran.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.