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Chaac : The Rain God

Chaac

Introduction

In the Yucatn region of Mexico, which is known for its rain, the deity known as Chaac was depicted in Classic times with large round eyes, a proboscis-like nose, and protruding fangs. Like other major Mayan gods, he was also made into a group of gods known as the Chacs. These gods were associated with the colors of the compass, which are red, white, yellow, and black.

During the post-Classic period, people were known to sacrifice their bodies in order to align themselves with the rain god. In the Chichén Itz region, priests were called chacs for their roles in holding the limbs and arms of the victims. In Toltec and Mayan ruins, the deity known as the Chacs Mool was worshipped.

Physical Traits

In Mayan mythology, the deity known as Chaac had a distinct appearance. He was typically depicted with a human body that had amphibian or reptilian scales, as well as a non-human head with long, pendulous noses and fangs. In the Classic style, a shell served as his ear ornament. The deity was also known for his long tongue and hooked nose.

His nose was turned up, which resembled that of an elephant’s nose. He was also depicted with animal attributes, such as scales, which could be related to fishes or reptiles. He was often depicted holding snakes and jade axes, which he uses to throw at the clouds in order to produce rain.

Family

In the Mayan myth of the Sun and Moon, the rain god known as Chaac is the brother of the deity Sun. They defeat their old adoptive mother and her lover. Later, the rain god Chaac is punished for having an affair with his brother’s wife and his tears of agony caused the rain to form. According to the various versions of this story, the rain god pursued the fleeing Moon and Sun with his lightning bolt.

Powers and Abilities

Many Mayan gods are associated with rain, and the deity known as Chaac is one of them. According to a legend, he was one of the individuals who helped open a mountain in order to find maize. Rain was very important to the Mayas as it was needed to provide them with enough water for their crops and drinking water.

In the Yucatec region, people were known to celebrate the deity known as Chaac by holding a banquet. During this event, four boys would perform in order to please the god. Similar rituals were also performed during the 16th century. Usually, the young men and women were thrown into the cenotes. In some cases, the victims were left to sink to the bottom of the cenote, while in others, they were retrieved and brought back to life. It was believed that those who were retrieved from the cenote had powers.

Modern Day Influence

In Smite, the character known as Chaac can be used as a warrior. In Final Fantasy 10-2, the enemy character known as Kucumatz and the creature known as Chaac have lower level counterparts.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.

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