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Home  |  Gods   |  European Gods   |  Celtic Gods   |  Badb : The Death Bringer

Badb : The Death Bringer

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At a glance

Description
Origin Celtic Mythology
Classification Gods
Family Members Ernmas (Mother), Cailitin (Father), Neit (Husband), Dagda (Husband), Macha, Nemain, Anand (Sisters)
Region Ireland
Associated With Death, Screams

Badb

Introduction

In Irish mythology, Badb is a warrior goddess who takes on the form of a crow. As a goddess of doom, she can be seen in various guises, such as a hideous hag who foretells the downfall of many. She appears in Togail Bruida Dchoca to predict the death of Condloinges. In addition, she takes the form of a woman who washes the chariot of a man named Cormac in what is considered to be an ill-fated act. The words “red-mouthed badbs” and “Pale badb” are used to describe the creatures that will be around the house when they hear the news.

Physical Traits

Many scholars conclude that Babd was a member of the Morrigan’s “crone” form, though she sometimes took on the appearance of a young woman, and Badb is regarded as the old woman in the trio. Although the Morrigan is not a complete system, some believe that it consists of a set of goddesses who are equal in power. Scholars believe that her appearance and the role of the crone are related to her fearsome cries and ability to take on the form of a crow during battle.

Family

Most of Badb’s family members are her sisters, who joined her as part of Morrigan. There, she was listed alongside such notable individuals as Anand, Nemain, Macha, and Banba. Her other sisters were also goddesses of sovereignty, such as Fodla and Eriu. Her mother, Ernmas, was regarded as a goddess of agriculture. Her father, Cailin, was a Druid. She was the wife of Neit, who was the god of war. She was sometimes referred to as the wife of Tethra, the Fomorian ruler.

Other names

The name Badb was an Old Irish word that means “battle crow.” In modern Gaelic, it means “crauch.” She was also referred to as Badb Catha, which also means “battle crow.” Scholars believe that the word was derived from the Germanic word “bodw.” The Old Norse bovar, which literally means “war,” might have been the source of the goddess’ name.

Powers and Abilities

She is feared by soldiers as she tries to move the tide of battle to her side. She can appear before a battle to predict the outcome, as well as the death of a notable individual. She would sometimes make predictions through cries, which are compared with the bean-sdhe or the banshee. Irish legends state that Badb appears either to warn of imminent death or participates in combat, where she creates a lot of confusion among the troops.

Modern Day Influence

She has been depicted with her sisters in various pop culture pieces. In Charles Moore’s A Dirty Job, Badb appears alongside her sisters. In Robert E. Howard’s The Phoenix on the Sword, she is mentioned. In Michael Scott’s Secrets of the Immortal, Badb appears alongside her sisters as a part of the Crow Goddess.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.