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Phaya Nak : The Water Serpent

Phaya Nak

Introduction

In Thai, the term phaya nak, which literally means “lord of Naga,” is derived from the word which means high nobility. Naga is regarded as the patron of water in Thai culture and are believed to inhabit caves or water bodies. 

According to a legend, the Mekong River in Laos and Thailand was created by two Naga kings as they slithered through the region. This river and its nearby Nan River are also known to produce mysterious fireballs. For many years now, it has been believed that the nagas in the region create these unusual fireballs. This phenomenon usually occurs every year along the Mekong River, which is near the border between the two countries. Usually, people gather at night along the river to catch a glimpse of the mysterious fireballs.

Physical Traits

The mythical serpent-like creatures known as the phaya nak are believed to inhabit the Mekong River and its surroundings. Some have suggested that these sightings are caused by the elongated fish with red crests, or an unusual type of marine creature known as an oarfish.

Family

The Singhanavati Kingdom in northern Thailand has a long history of having a strong connection with the nagas. It’s believed that the kingdom was built with the help of the serpent-like creatures. The royal family reverenced the nagas and eventually renamed the kingdom.

Powers and Abilities

In Thai folklore, the nagas are believed to protect the Buddha from a storm by spreading their serpent heads. They are also known to appear on the roofs of various temples in the country. In addition to these, the nagas are also believed to play a role in controlling the flow of water in the country. According to some people, the annual rainfall prediction is made using the Naga’s concept of Nak Hai Nam.

Modern Day Influence

In Thailand’s north-eastern region of Isan, people believe that the nagas and their demigods are responsible for the unnatural wave phenomena that appear in the area’s lakes and rivers. They also believe that these serpent-like creatures are responsible for the odd marks found on various objects, such as car hoods and house walls.

Scientists from Thailand’s University of Science have tried to explain the strange sightings by suggesting that the phaya nak are preternatural phenomena caused by waves in the water. They also believe that the tracks of the mythical creatures are possibly the work of humans.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.

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