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Home  |  Gods   |  Oceanian Gods   |  Melanesian Gods   |  Fijian Gods   |  Nangananga : Goddess of the Dead

Nangananga : Goddess of the Dead

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At a glance

Description
Origin Melanesian Mythology
Classification Gods
Family Members Dakuwaqa (Father)
Region Fiji Islands
Associated With Death, Underworld

Nangananga

Introduction

The rich tapestry of Fijian mythology is teeming with deities who play vital roles in the cultural and spiritual life of the islands. Among these divine figures, Nangananga stands out as a significant goddess, presiding over the realm of the dead. Nangananga’s origins are deeply rooted in Fijian mythology, a testament to the profound connection between the people of Fiji and their spiritual heritage. She is often associated with the Kadavu Island in Fiji, and it is on this island that her legends find their most profound resonance.

Family

In Fijian folklore, Nangananga is considered to be the offspring of the mighty ocean deity, Dakuwaqa. Her divine ancestry grants her a special place among the Fijian gods and goddesses. Her distinctive heritage combines aspects of the ocean, the afterlife, and the human world, reflecting the interdependence of these realms in Fijian beliefs.

Other names

Nangananga is also known as Nan-Ga Nan-Ga, Nanga Nanga, Nangganangga

Powers and Abilities

Nangananga, the Fijian Goddess of Death, plays a pivotal part in Fijian beliefs. She’s said to live in the spiritual world, where she guides the souls of those who have passed away. Her realm is frequently depicted as a peaceful and idyllic land, where the spirits of the dead discovery rest and tranquility. This serene afterlife reflects the Fijian view of death as a transition rather than an end, in line with their belief in the cyclical nature of life.

Nangananga isn’t just a companion to the afterlife; she also judges the souls of the departed. Fijian tradition frequently portrays her as a just but strict deity, assessing the conduct and deeds of the departed during their time on earth. Those who lived righteous lives are awarded with eternal happiness in her realm, while those with a history of errors may face a more delicate trip.

Nangananga waits by the seacoast on a black gemstone near the entrance to the Underworld (Mbulu) for your soul to arrive. Single men have no chance of getting past her while even married men have to prove their worth.

Modern Day Influence

There are very few references in modern day for Nangananga as she is not a popular deity especially due to her association with death and punishment.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.