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Home  |  Hybrids   |  South American Hybrids   |  Mayan Hybrids   |  Nagual : The Were Jaguar

Nagual : The Were Jaguar

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At a glance

Description
Origin Mayan Mythology
Classification Hybrids
Family Members N/A
Region Mesoamerica
Associated With Shapeshifting, Transformation

Nagual

Introduction

The term nagual, also spelled nahual, refers to the guardian spirit of some Mesoamerican Indians. In some areas the nagual is the animal into which certain powerful men can transform themselves to do evil; thus, the word derives from the Nahuatl word nahualli (“disguise”), applied to the animal forms magically assumed by sorcerers.

The person who receives his nagual typically goes to an isolated spot and stays there until he awakens. According to some cultures the nagual becomes associated with a person while he is a child and the first animal to cross over the ashes of the child is his nagual. The belief in nagualism varies from region to region. In some areas it is believed that only the most powerful leaders (usually men) possess naguals. In others, all or most people have personal animal guardian spirits.

Naguals are born with a strong and weak side. The traits of these animals are linked to a person’s birth day. For instance, a person born on Dog Day would have both a strong and weak side of a dog. In Mexico, it is believed that a person who receives a nagual must make a pact with the devil in order to be considered as an offering. At night, this animal can transform into a wolf, dog, or a bird.

Physical Traits

The nagual is a normal person, usually male, in their physicality while in the human form. They transform into a jaguar according to some records while other say that they start displaying only a few characteristics of the sacred animal.

Other Names

The word nagual is derived from the word nahualli that translates to “transforming witch.” In English, the term is often translated as “shape shifter.” In many English writings, it is also spelt nahual.

Powers and Abilities

Naguals are believed to be as powerful as werewolves due to their ability to fight on equal footing. They are also considered to be the creations of the god Tezcatlipoca. Unlike werewolves, a person can easily transform into a nagual at will. However, just like humans, these creatures require special skills and mental strength to overcome their curse. Naguals typically shift when they are threatened, under immense stress, or when they are in the presence of evil although that depends on what sort of person has been cursed into a nagual.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What does nagual mean?

In Mayan mythology, nagual is a personal guardian spirit that is usually in the form of an animal like a Jaguar. This spirit can cause the person to transform as into the animal as well.

How do you become a nagual?

The nagual trait is acquired at birth, along with other characteristics associated with a person’s birth day.

What does the word nagual mean?

The word nagual is derived from the word nahualli that translates to “transforming witch.”

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.