Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Home  |  Gods   |  Asian Gods   |  Japanese Gods   |  Kagutsuchi : The Fire God

Kagutsuchi : The Fire God

Listen

At a glance

Description
Origin Japanese Mythology
Classification Gods
Family Members Inzanami (Mother), Inzanagi (Father)
Region Japan
Associated With Fire

Kagutsuchi

Introduction

Kagutsuchi is the Shinto god of fire in Japanese mythology also known as Hi-no-Kagutsuchi. He is the father of 8 gods, including those from the mountain and warrior realms. Due to the destructive power of fire, he became an important part of Shinto ritual. He was killed and decimated into multiple pieces giving rise to volcanoes in the region.

Explore 5 Gods of Fire from Various Mythologies Worldwide Here

Physical Traits

From what we know from mythological records, Kagutsuchi was extremely hot to the touch and was either composed completely of fire or used to frequently spout fire.

Family

Kagutsuchi was born to Izanami, who died due to the intense heat that was generated during his birth. His enraged father, Izanagi, beheaded him with his sword and carved his body into eight volcanoes. His corpse then became various deities, such as Watatsumi, Ōyamatsumi, Futsunushi, Kuraokami, Takemikazuchi, and Amatsumikaboshi.

In an alternative version, before she dies, Izanami gives birth to three new gods: the water kami, the clay princess, and the gourd. Her dying children are then instructed to watch out for Kagutsuchi and to pacify him when he gets out of hand. These goddesses also represent the traditional Japanese fire fighting equipment.

Other Names

He has been know to be referred in other writings as Hi-no-Kagutsuchi

Powers and Abilities

Kagutsuchi was the embodiment of fire which then gave rice to the volcanoes in the Japanese region. As fire is an essential component in metallurgy, he is also considered to have provided the Japanese people with metals for metallurgy and daily life. As he was born to the supreme gods in Japanese mythology, he was also responsible for the creation of multiple kami and other gods with his death.

Modern Day Influence

Even today fire worship and fire reverence is a major part of the Shinto religion and the Japanese culture. Fire is considered to be a very powerful natural phenomenon and is accorded the utmost respect. Kagtsuchi is also worshipped to prevent the now extinct volcanoes from erupting.

Kagutsuchi has made appearances in various visual novels and manga. In the anime, he is a powerful dragon-like creature who is a sharingan technique. In Destiny of the Spirits, Kagutsuchi is a female character who is a level 70 boss and he is referred to as an evil serpent deity. In the Age of Ishtar, he is also referred to as a fire demon.

Related Images

Your subscription could not be saved. Please try again.
Your subscription has been successful.

Newest addition

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Kagutsuchi in Naruto?

In anime and manga, Kagutsuchi refers to the manipulation of the black flames by Ameterasu.

Did Kagutsuchi kill his mother?

Kagutsuchi killed his mother Izanami in childbirth due to his fiery nature and burned her while being born.

In which video game does Kagutsuchi appear?

Kagutsuchi is a level 70 female boss character in the video game Destiny of Spirits and also represented as a snake deity.

Watch

We know you love our quizzes?

Take our new quiz on Philippine Mythology and see if you can break the current record of 69%.

We challenge you to get a perfect 100%

We know you love our quizzes?

Take our new quiz on Philippine Mythology and see if you can break the current record of 69%.

We challenge you to get a perfect 100%

Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.