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Home  |  Animals   |  Egyptian Animals   |  Bennu : The Egyptian Phoenix

Bennu : The Egyptian Phoenix

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At a glance

Description
Origin Egyptian Mythology
Classification Animals
Family Members N/A
Region Egypt
Associated With Rebirth, Sun, Creation

Bennu

Introduction

It is believed that the Bennu, which was a self-made entity, played a significant role in the creation process. It was said that it was the ba of Ra, and it provided Atum with the creative impetus. It was said that it flew over the Nun’s waters, landing on a rocky surface, and issued a call that established the nature of creation, which was associated with Osiris. Originally of solar associations, the Benu bird came to be connected with three important gods consisting of Atum, Re and Osiris.

Physical Traits

The iconography of the Benu bird was most likely created at the site of Heliopolis, where it was first shown as a symbol of solar deities. Pyramid Texts indicated that the bird was made from a yellow wagtail. On the other hand, the New Kingdom depicted it as a gray heron. During this period, in Egyptian mythology, the Benu bird was depicted with long beak and legs, and a two-toned crested head. It was often associated with the great solar god and was depicted in a ben-ben stone. But due to its association with Osiris, it was sometimes also put in the sacred willow of the god.

In various instances, the Benu was depicted wearing the Atef crown as it was associated with Osiris. A sarcophagus containing the Divine Adoratrice’s sarcophagus, which is currently on display in the British Museum, shows the bird perched on a willow tree. In a different form, it could also be depicted as a man wearing a head of a bird. In terms of its appearance, the Benu bird is typically described as a large eagle-like bird with a red and gold plumage.

Family

It’s believed that the Bennu bird flew over the Nun before the initial creation. According to the tradition, it cried out after resting on a rock, which revealed what was not yet revealed. In ancient Egyptian mythology, the Bennu bird was regarded as the ba of Re. During the Late Period, the sign used to spell the name of the sun god was based on the bird’s image. In the Middle Kingdom, it was believed that the Bennu of Re was the source of Atum’s existence. The birth of the Bennu bird is attributed to self-generation, similar to that of the sun god. In a mythological fragment from the 21st Dynasty, a scarab beetle and a heart-amulet are depicted standing near to the Bennu. 

Powers and Abilities

According to some sources, the ancient Egyptian bird, Bennu, was a powerful deity that had various abilities. Some of these include being able to create himself and fly over the Nun’s waters. He was also able to establish a call that helped determine the order of things and the nature of creation. The Benu bird was able to renew itself every day, as well as every 500 years. It was also associated with the sun god, Atum, and the underworld god, Osiris. It symbolized rebirth and resurrection.

Modern Day Influence

The Bennu name refers to an ancient and small asteroid that NASA is currently studying as part of its OSIRIS-REX mission. The mission’s goal is to examine the origins of life in our solar system. The object was chosen as its target due to its apparent organic materials.

In the video game Assassin’s Creed Origins, the character known as Bennu is a giant white heron. He can be found in the desert region of Siwa and is a legendary boss that players can take on. He is also linked to a side quest known as “The Curse of the Pharaohs,” where he appears as a depiction of the afterlife.

The character known as Bennu is featured in the TV series, The Originals. He’s a powerful witch whose ancestors have cursed him to be resurrected every 100 years. In addition, he’s also known as the Hollow, which is a dark entity that aims to consume life and magic.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.