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Home  |  Hybrids   |  Middle Eastern Hybrids   |  Babylonian Hybrids   |  Bashmu : The Horned Serpent

Bashmu : The Horned Serpent

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At a glance

Description
Origin Babylonian Mythology
Classification Hybrids
Family Members N/A
Region Iraq
Associated With Astronomy

Bashmu

Introduction

The Mesopotamian mythological creature known as the Bashmu or “Venomous Snake” was a horned snake with wings and forelegs. It was also the name of the constellation of the Akkadians, which is similar to the Greek Hydra.

The terms usum, which means “portrayed with feet,” and mus-sa-tur, which means “birth goddess snake,” may represent different types of demons or iconographic entities. The terms were first mentioned in a 22nd-century BC inscription at the town of Gudea.

Physical Traits

The Bashmu is a filter-feeder that lives in rivers such as the Euphrates and the Tigris. It feeds on algae and fish, though it can also go onto land to nourish itself on livestock and humans. Although it only has one mouth, the Bashmu is known to have many teeth, with some specimens having multiple rows of teeth. Also, due to their shark-like appearance, they can have multiple divided tongues.

Despite their lack of wings for flight, the snake can still swim with its fore-legs equipped with wing-like structures. The belly and wings of the Bashmu are usually hidden when it’s on land. These are usually visible during a mating or threat display.

Family

Bashmu was one of the eleven warriors who were defeated by Ninurta in the book, Angim. According to an Assyrian myth, the serpent was created in the sea and measured sixty feet long. It was said to have devoured various animals, birds, and humans, and it was sent to destroy them by the gods Nergal and Palil. The Enuma Elish creation myth also featured the bashmu as one of the creatures created by Tiamat.

Other Names

Bashmu was also known as Bashumu and Mussatur in ancient Mesopotamia.

Powers and Abilities

The Bashmu is one of the many Dragon species that can communicate with humans using the Parsel tongue. Although this is commonly used to communicate with other dragons like Asian Serpent Dragons and Nidhoggs, the Bashmu can also understand and communicate with snakes.

Modern Day Influence

Not much of the ancient Babylonian myths have survived the test of time and hybrid creatures like the Bashmu have either been assimilated into later civilizations and religions or been forgotten completely.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Who is the Bashmu?

The Mesopotamian mythological creature known as the Bashmu or “Venomous Snake” was a horned snake with wings and forelegs.

Where did the Bashmu live?

The Babylonian hybrid creature Bashmu is said to have lived in the rivers Tigris and Euphrates.

Where is Babylon today?

Babylon which is where the mythology of the Bashmu is said to originate is located in modern day Iraq.

In which video game does Bashmu appear?

Bashmu is a playable character in the MMORPG Tibia which is popular even today despitye being over 25 years old.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.