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Home  |  Animals   |  Asian Animals   |  Indonesian Animals   |  Babi Ngepet : The Boar Demon

Babi Ngepet : The Boar Demon

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At a glance

Description
Origin Indonesian Mythology
Classification Animals
Family Members N/A
Region Indonesia
Associated With Black Magic, Robbery

Babi Ngepet

Introduction

Babi ngepet is believed to be the product of a person who practices pesugihan babi black magic. This type of magic involves a person surrendering their humanity in exchange for becoming rich instantly. The person is then transformed into a boar or allowing themselves to be possessed by a demon win the shape of a boar. It has similarities with the Western concept of a werewolf.

Physical Traits

Babi Ngepet looks like a wild boar, but it is much larger than a regular boar. When viewed through the camera, it has a muddy complexion and bloody mouth along with a human face.

Powers and Abilities

Some myths suggest that before a man turns into a creature, he is placed inside black robes. Babi Ngepet then attacks the village and steals its valuables by rubbing its body against the wall, door, cupboard, furniture or vaults. Once the man returns home, the black robes will be full of money and jewellery.

The person who practices black magic needs someone else to help them. Babi Ngepet’s assistant is usually tasked with guarding a lit candle from the outside world. If the flame is starting to fade, this is a sign that the magic practitioner is in danger.

People who practice the art of black music will light a candle and float it on a water trough. They will then rob the village while the lit candle is floating on the water. If the candle’s flame gets too dim, or fades, then Babi Ngepet is in danger. Since this belief is believed in the villages, they kill any animal that approaches them at night.

Modern Day Influence

The skeptical view is that it was a way to explain the mysterious disappearance of fortune. It could have been a way to control wild boars that were destroying the rice fields. The association of the boar with magic concerning fortune probably originated from Javanese pre-Islamic and pre-Hindu-Buddhist beliefs that associate the boar with domestic richness, fortune and prosperity, similar to its connections with Celengan, which means piggy bank in Javanese. The word Celengan is derived from word Celeng which means boar.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is the pig demon mythology?

This is arguably the most well-known pig demon in mythology. Originating from Java and Bali, the Babi Ngepet is a boar-like creature invoked through “Pesugihan,” a form of black magic promising wealth in exchange for the practitioner’s humanity. The Babi Ngepet possesses the sorcerer at night, transforming them into a hideous pig-like creature that steals from others to fulfill the pact.

What is the mythical creature babi?

In the regions of Java and Bali, a boar demon is frequently encountered, believed to embody the practices of “pesugihan babi” black magic. This malevolent entity is portrayed as a boar with piercing eyes and radiant teeth, serving as a representation of those delving into dark arts.

What is the story behind babi ngepet?

The Babi Ngepet is a creature from Indonesian folklore that originates from black magic rituals called “pesugihan babi.” People who practice this ritual transform into boar-like beings to steal wealth, but it comes at the cost of their humanity. The Babi Ngepet symbolizes the dangers of greed and seeking wealth through unethical means, serving as a cautionary tale to be content with what one has.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention of Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.