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Ahuizotl : The Water Beast

Ahuizotl

Introduction

The Aztecs’ mythical creature known as the Ahuizotl is said to inhabit the waters around Tenochtitlan, which is the capital of the empire. It is believed that this creature is a malevolent force that preys on people who wander too close to the surface of the water.

Some people believe that the Ahuizotl is real, while others think that it’s a mythological creature that has relatives that still exist. It’s believed that the Aztec ruler known as Ahuitzotl took the mythical creature as his mascot. He was an 8th-century military leader and a great ruler. His reign saw the Aztec Empire expand and consolidate.

According to Aztec beliefs, those who drowned went to Tlaloc, which is the home of the water god Tlaloc and his wife, Chalchiuhtlicue. It’s believed that these individuals were chosen because they were good people who should be rewarded with an eternal life in Tlaloc. They also reportedly hoarded precious water symbols and stones in order to avoid offering them to the gods.

Physical Traits

The Ahuizotl is described as a black creature with a slippery skin. Its fur is said to be thick and waterproof, and whenever it gets out of the water, it would often form a lump on the surface. It’s believed that this animal is similar to a small dog with a long tail and small pointed ears. The end of the Ahuizotl’s tail is a hand, which is similar to a person’s body parts. Due to its unusual taste for various body parts, such as nails, teeth, and eyes, the corpses of its victims are often found without these body parts. Scientists believe that the creature could be related to other animals such as otter and ferret.

Other Names

The ahuizotl is named from the Classical Nahuatl language which means “spiny aquatic thing” or “water dog”

Powers and Abilities

It’s believed that the Ahuizotl was tasked with protecting lakes, and it was its main role was to scare away the fish that were in them. Due to its dangerous nature, stories about how it would sink boats started to emerge. In an attempt to appease the creature, fishermen would sometimes offer a portion of their catch to try and scare it away.

In some stories, the Ahuizotl would use various tricks to lure its victims into its death. One of these is by imitating the cry of a child. It would then grab its prey’s ankle if they were too close to the water’s edge.

The Aztecs believed that the Ahuizotl would grab its prey and hold on to them until they die. It’s believed that the victims would eventually meet their demise due to violent drowning. The Aztecs believed that their souls were going to Tlaloc, the water god.

Modern Day Influence

Despite the widespread belief that the Ahuizotl is a mythological creature, some people have attempted to explain its various characteristics. For instance, some believe that it could have been a beaver, as it’s a good swimmer. However, the flat tail and teeth of a beaver are not the same as those of the Ahuizotl.

Another animal that people believe could be a potential prey for the Ahuizotl is the otter. It’s believed that this animal would attack people whenever its nest gets threatened. Otters, on the other hand, have round ears instead of pointed ones, and they are referred to as Aizcuintli in the Codex of Florence. It’s also possible that the Ahuizotl is a purely mythical creature that has not yet been identified.

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Disclaimer: While it is the intention Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.
Disclaimer: While it is the intention Mythlok and its editors to keep all the information about various characters as mythologically accurate as possible, this site should not be considered mythical, legendary or folkloric doctrine in any way. We welcome you using this website for any research, journal or study but citing this website for any academic work would be at your own personal risk.

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